36,445 Original Miles

 

Automatic Transmission
4.7L 289ci V8
200 hp @ 4400 rpm*
282 lb/ft torque @ 2400 rpm*
Capable 0-60 MPH: 9 seconds
Top Speed: 120 mph
*Base Price in 1965: $2,427

 

*Seller Asking:

$17,500

1965 ford mustang for sale
 
 
Fast Facts:

  • The Ford Mustang was young Lee Iacocca’s response to John Delorean’s highly successful Pontiac GTO. Lee was Ford’s Vice President at the time
  • The wheelbase, track, and overall length is identical to the Ford Falcon – the car which the Mustang is based off of. The driver’s seat of the Mustang is moved back 9 inches compared to the Falcon, allowing for a longer hood at the cost of a smaller trunk
  • During its development, the Mustang was referred to as the Cougar. The name was eventually switched to “Mustang” because “it had the excitement of wide open spaces and was American as all hell.” – Frank Thomas, Ford account executive. Rather than discard the other name ideas, Ford used them on other cars, including “Torino” and Mercury’s Cougar
  • The 1964 Mustang’s $2,368 base price was a whopping $1000 less than the competition. Ford anticipated 100k cars would sell in the first year. Instead, over 400k were sold. Lee Iacocca said that 100k alone were sold due to the Mustang’s simultaneous appearance on the covers of Time and Newsweek (April 1964)
  • The Mustang emblem at one point was slated to resemble the Knight on a chessboard. Lee said no, as he wanted the emblem to resemble a “wild horse”, symbolizing the excitement of freedom
  • A pre-production Mustang (serial no.1) was unintentionally sold to a Canadian buyer, despite the fact that it wasn’t intended for the public (stories vary between whether the dealer was under the influence of buyer persuasion, or if it was simply an accident). Regardless, Ford had to have it back, but the Canadian wouldn’t let go of the car. After 2 years of repeat attempts, Ford decided to offer him the 1 millionth Mustang off the assembly line, in exchange for the no.1 car. The Canadian agreed, and the no.1 has resided within the Henry Ford Museum ever since
Key Model Year Changes:

  • Changes occurred in middle of the ’65 model year
  • A late ’65 Mustang differentiates itself from an early ’65 by the following:
  • The use of an alternator instead of a generator. This means early ’65’s will have a “GEN” warning light on the dash (for generator) and later cars will have an “ALT” warning light (for alternator)
  • Smaller horns
  • Bigger shifter handle
  • The passenger seat is now adjustable (they were stationary in the early cars)
  • The “Mustang” fender emblem is now 5 inches in size, vs 4-3/8″ on the early cars
  • The full bench seat (found on this example) was only available on late ’65 cars

Seller Notes:

  • 36k original miles. All stock
  • Owned by same family for 17 years
  • Always garaged
  • 289/automatic. This is a late ’65 Mustang
  • Pristine!
  •              

  • Location: Citrus Heights, California – (more photos below)
  • View Seller’s Ad
  • Disclaimer: New Old Cars LLC is not affiliated with or endorsed by Craigslist
 
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UPDATE: ad is no longer available (sold or expired)

To list your own car, contact us HERE.

 
*SAE rated from factory. May not reflect current output
*Performance numbers pulled from reputable automotive road tests
*Base price when new does not reflect original MSRP of this particular car, nor does it reflect what the original owner paid for it
*Advertised price at time of posting. Sellers can raise or lower prices on their original ad at any time. Click on the original ad to view current price/availability
Mileage Disclaimer: NOC has not confirmed if the mileage stated by the seller is true and accurate. It is up to the buyer to verify these claims. Vehicle history reports, service records stating mileage, and even inspections of odometer tampering are recommended.

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